Astronomy Review(Fa07)

Astronomy - Exam Review Monday December 17 5:30p to 7:30p Rm 207 Bring Questions Final Exam Wednesday December 19 9:30a to 11:30a Rm 350

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Exam Review : Monday, December 17, 5:30p to 7:30p Rm. 207 Bring Questions Final Exam : Wednesday, December 19, 9:30a to 11:30a Rm. 350 Cumulative (Approx: 60% old; 40% New) 2 hours to complete test You should bring pencil and 3 notecards (2 from earlier tests plus one for new material – provided earlier in class) with notes to use during the test People Association, Solar System Association, Multiple Choice, and Short Answer Study Strategy : Review Old Quizzes and Tests Review Lecture Packets o Outlines at beginning of each o 3-5 major points per class Major points from text chapters Then fill in details as you have time UNIT 1: Our Sky and Historical Astronomy I. Observing the Sky: Motions 1. Motions in the Sky A) Sun B) Moon C) Stars D) Planets 2. Appearance of the Moon A) Visibility B) Lunar Phases C) Given 2 of 3 provide third Location in Sky Lunar Phase Time of Day 3. Eclipses II. Patterns in the Sky 1. Astronomical Coordinates A) Right Ascension and Declination Observer Independent B) Azimuth and Altitude Observer Dependent 2. Celestial Sphere A) Zenith, Nadir, and Horizon B) North Celestial Pole, South Celestial Pole, and Celestial Equator C) The Meridian
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3. Seasons A) Relationship Between Sun, Earth, and Ecliptic Equinoxes and Solstices Position/Motion of Sun thru year Length Day 4. Stars and Constellations A) Circumpolar Stars B) The Zodiac III. Explaining the Sky: Earth and Time 1. Major Motions of the Earth A) Rotation B) Revolution C) Precession 2. Measuring Time A) Tropical Year vs. Sidereal Year B) The Solar Day and Civil Time C) The Calendar IV. Explaining the Sky: The Moon 1. Major Motions of Moon A) Orbital Motion B) Lunar Rotation 2. Eclipses A) Solar Eclipse B) Lunar Eclipse 3. Tides on Earth A) Causes B) Types V. Ancient Astronomy (Greek Astronomy) 1. Greek Ideology: Circles and Spheres 2. Geocentric View vs. Heliocentric View 3. Greeks (major contribution(s) of each) A) Aristotle B) Aristarchus C) Erastosthenes D) Hipparchus E) Ptolemy VI. The Copernican Revolution 1. Nicolaus Copernicus and Heliocentric Model A) Inferior Planets: Inferior Conjunction, Superior Conjunction, and Elongation B) Superior Planets: Conjunction, Opposition, and Quadrature 2. Tycho Brahe A) Geocentric System B) Most accurate pre-telescopic observations
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3. Galileo Galilei A) 7 Telescopic Discoveries and their significance B) Science vs. Religion VII. Modern Astronomy 1. Galileo Galilei A) 1 st Experimental Scientist B) Foundations for Newton’s work (discovered 1 st law) 2. Johannes Kepler A) Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion Ellipse Law: perihelion, aphelion Areas Law Harmonic Law 3. Isaac Newton A) Newton’s Laws of Motion Inertia Law Force Law Action/Reaction Law B) Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Inverse Square Law Applications: Ex. Orbits VIII. Nature of Light
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2008 for the course ASTRO 112 taught by Professor Burns during the Spring '08 term at MATC Madison.

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Astronomy - Exam Review Monday December 17 5:30p to 7:30p Rm 207 Bring Questions Final Exam Wednesday December 19 9:30a to 11:30a Rm 350

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