Final - Avi Baron Diaspora Literature Final 2 The next...

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Avi Baron Diaspora Literature Final 2. The next morning, I had twelve bridesmaids’ hair to style. I drove a half hour to the salon, blasting the stereo and letting my hair fly out of the cracked window. I’m a co- owner of The Jeweled Crown. We do hair, massage, nails, makeup, hair removal, weddings, and other events. We’d recently hired a muhajjaba hair stylist, Jauhara, who rented out one of the rooms we reserved for massages, to do other muhajjabat’s hair in the privacy of the room. Turns out chicks who wear hijab like to get their hair did more often than chicks who don’t. Our master colorist, a boy named Keith, was once a girl. Other stylists sometimes ask him how “it works,” and he offers to show them, and they giggle wildly. Once, a muhajjaba wanted to get her hair colored by him, since he’s a much better colorist than Jauhara. He flat out refused, because she obviously thought that Keith wasn’t really a man. Eventually, the exotic hotness of doing a veiled woman’s hair took over and Keith abandoned his moral and ethical objections and got down with the peach-blonde lowlights. This passage is taken from “Accidental Transients” written by Randa Jarrar. This comes right after Dina was running late and couldn’t make breakfast for her family, so her brothers decided to make breakfast on their own and started a fire in their house. That scene is the epitome of the story as Dina’s family cannot function without her, even though they make fun of the fact that she still lives at home at her age. Here we are introduced to Dina’s life for the first time outside of her house, her job as a hair stylist. From this job Dina will save up money secretly to finally move out of her house. From doing a close reading of the passage we find several language choices that are interesting. Firstly, we find Jarrar to describe Dina as a woman in power from him saying that Dina is, “a co- owner of The Jeweled Crown.” Until this point Dina is viewed a submissive character who must act in accordance to her religion and family obligations. Yet, now Dina describes her business and the people she has hired, making her seem important. Another interesting point comes towards the end of the passage, with regards to the tarns-gender stylist, Keith. Keith used to be a woman, but now identifies with the male sex. This is important because Dina is an Arabic woman, which make more religiously strict Arabic women who cover themselves with Hijab comfortable to come to her salon. These women who cover themselves do so, to hide themselves from the view of men for many reasons. Keith, now a male, wouldn’t be allowed to style these women’s hair, yet they want him to because they still identify him as a woman. Through these findings we question Jarrar on his motive. Why did he decide to make Dina into a character of power? What was Jarrar trying to say about the importance of identification? The first question is easier to answer than the second. I believe she is given power and importance, so that we see Arabic women in a different light. Times have changed as
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