Ch7 lecture notes

Ch7 lecture notes - Chapter 7 Rock Deformation (Folding and...

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Chapter 7 Rock Deformation (Folding and Fracturing) Read Chapter 7
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Folded sedimentary rocks, NW Canada
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Outline I. How rocks deform A. Brittle versus ductile rocks 1. Brittle rocks - deform by fracturing 2. Ductile rock - deform by changing shape B. Plate tectonic forces that deform rocks 1. Compressive stress - squeezes rock 2. Tensional stress - stretches rock 3. Sheer stress - slippage II. Deformation structures A. Orientation of structure - strike and dip B. Deformation structures 1. Types of folds Symmetrical folds Asymmetrical folds Overturn folds
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b. Fold structures Anticline Syncline Basin Dome 2. Fractures a. Joints b. Faults Normal fault Reverse fault (thrust fault) Strike slip fault (transform fault)
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Rock deformation When a rock is under stress, it will change its shape and volume, and finally ruptures Folds and faults are the common structures produced by deformation of rocks
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Folds
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Faults
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Lab experiment deformation of marble at low and high pressure
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Rocks may be brittle or ductile Brittle material experiences little change until it breaks Ductile material experiences continuous plastic deformation until it breaks In general, a rock behaves as a brittle material at low P and T and behaves as a ductile material at high P and T Igneous and metamorphic rocks are brittle and sedimentary are ductile
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course GEOL 1001 taught by Professor Baksi during the Fall '07 term at LSU.

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Ch7 lecture notes - Chapter 7 Rock Deformation (Folding and...

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