Ch5-lecture notes

Ch5-lecture notes - Chapter 5 Sediments and sedimentary...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 Sediments and sedimentary rocks This week’s assignment: Read Chapter 5
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sedimentary rocks, Guadalupe Mountains, NM
Image of page 2
Outline I. Classification of sedimentary rocks A. Clastic sedimentary rocks - by size 1. Conglomerates 2. Sandstone 3. Siltstone 4. Shale B. Chemical and biological sedimentary rocks 1. Chemical - limestone, rock salt, gypsum 2. Biochemical - chalk, chert, coal
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
II. Transportation III. Sedimentary environments A. Continental Fluvial, dessert, lake, glacial B. Near shore Delta, Beach C. Marine Shelf Continental margin Deep Sea
Image of page 4
IV. Lithification and diagenesis A. Compaction and dehydration B. Cementation V. Sedimentary structures A. Stratification B. Cross bedding C. Graded bedding D. Ripple marks, mud cracks, burrows of organisms
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Why are sedimentary rocks important? They preserve the history of events, life and environment on Earth They are reservoirs of energy resources, such as oil, gas, and coal.
Image of page 6
Sedimentary rocks are produced by surface processes in the rock cycle Weathering Erosion Transportation Deposition Burial Diagensis
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Two main types of sediments 1. Clastic sediments Solid fragments derived from physical and chemical weathering of rocks. May be minerals inherited from parent rocks (e.g. quartz and feldspars) or new minerals formed from chemical weathering (e.g. clay minerals, iron oxide)
Image of page 8
2. Chemical and biological sediments a. chemical sediments (inorganic) Precipitation from saline lakes or ocean as a result of evaporation b. biological Calcium carbonate and silica shells of organisms Vegetation- peat and coal
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
A. Clastic sedimentary rock:
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern