Patho - Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma

Patho - Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma - Medical Diagnosis...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Medical  Diagnosis Pathophysiology Clinical Manifestations Diagnostic Studies Complications Metastatic  Colorectal  Carcinoma Metastatic colorectal  cancer is cancer that  has spread, or  metastasized, through  either the bloodstream  or the lymph node  system, to other parts  of the body, such as  the liver, lung, or  ovary. Symptoms can include: o a change in bowel habits such as diarrhea, constipation, or  narrowing of the stool that lasts for more than a few days  o a feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is  not relieved by doing so  o rectal bleeding or blood in the stool (often, though, the stool  will look normal)  o cramping or steady abdominal (stomach area) pain  o weakness and fatigue  o pain in the belly o loss of appetite o unexplained weight loss However, you may not have symptoms at first, so screening is  important. If your cancer has spread, you may have other symptoms, 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course NURS 210 taught by Professor Jones-thomas during the Spring '08 term at Lady of the Lake.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online