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Cloning PowerPoint notes - Cloning PowerPoint notes July...

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Cloning PowerPoint notes: July 5 th , 1996: Dolly, a female sheep, was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult somatic cell. Of the 277 adult udder cells that they used to perform nuclear transfers, twenty-nine grew into developing embryos, which Wilmut and Campbell let incubate in sheep oviducts for a week before transferring each to surrogate mothers. Of these twenty-nine embryos, one turned into a successful pregnancy. The February 1997 announcement of Dolly's birth absolutely shocked the scientific community, who at the time generally believed that cloning from adult cells could not be done. The discovery also triggered a massive public debate about the ethics of future cloning practices. PPL Theraputics, the principle sponsor of Wilmut and Campbell's research, obtained the patent rights on the cloning process. On February 15, 2003, it was announced that Dolly had been euthanised because of a progressive lung disease and crippling arthritis. A Finn Dorset such as Dolly would have had a life expectancy of around 12 - 15 years, but Dolly only lived to 6 years of age. March 1997: Only a week after the announcement of Dolly, scientists bring cloning technology closer to humans by “twinning” rhesus monkeys from embryos. The monkeys were developed using cells from different embryos so they aren’t genetically identical. March through June 1997: On March 4, 1997, President Clinton, in response to the large scale human cloning ethics debate brought about by Ian Wilmut's announcement of the creation of Dolly, proposed a five year moratorium on federal and privately funded human cloning research. In addition to this proposal, Clinton asked the National Bioethics Advisory Commission to review the prospects of human cloning and determine if legal preventive actions should be taken.
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