Examples 6.4

Examples 6.4 - Notes 6.4 Truth Tables for Arguments In...

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Notes 6.4 Truth Tables for Arguments In order to test for validity in an argument using truth tables, all we have to do is the following: 1. Symbolize the argument (if necessary—it won’t always be on the test) to represent the simple propositions. 2. Write out the symbolized argument, placing a single slash between the premises and a double slash between the last premise and the conclusion. 3. Make a truth table for that argument as if it were a normal proposition broken into parts. 4. Look for a line in which all of the premises are true and the conclusion is false. If such a line obtains, then the argument is invalid; if not, then it’s valid. This ought to make sense according to how we’ve defined validity all semester long. For deductive arguments, we’ve defined invalidity by possibly having true premises and a false conclusion (i.e., if we assume true premises, we better not have a false conclusion— or else the argument is invalid.). This truth table method gives us all the possibilities of
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Examples 6.4 - Notes 6.4 Truth Tables for Arguments In...

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