Examples 7.5

Examples 7.5 - Examples 7.5 Conditional Proof So, here's...

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Examples 7.5 Conditional Proof So, here’s not another rule, but a method for obtaining conclusions in a proof sequence. It works, in theory, like the following: imagine that you have a conclusion to derive that’s a conditional (say, A E). What this conclusion says is that, if we assume A is true, then we can get E. So, what we’ll do is just assume A is true. Then, if we can derive E (by itself, I mean), we will be allowed to conclude that A E (is true). In other words, by appealing to this method, you will ensure that your resulting conditional is true (because you’ve shown that if the antecedent is true, then the conclusion must be true, too —this avoids the only way of making the overall conditional false). This may seem a bit like cheating, but it’s totally legal in terms of derivations. So, if you see that the conclusion asked for is a conditional (the main operator is a horseshoe), then you might at least consider using this method (generally, if it’s not the only possible way to derive a
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course PHIL 2203 taught by Professor Barrett during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

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Examples 7.5 - Examples 7.5 Conditional Proof So, here's...

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