Examples 7.6

Examples 7.6 - Examples 7.6 Indirect Proof Again, like...

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Examples 7.6 Indirect Proof Again, like conditional proof, an indirect proof is a method for deriving conclusions. This method works in the following way: we’ll assume the opposite of the conclusion we’re trying to derive, and then see whether we can find a contradiction. If we can derive a contradiction from our assumption, we know the opposite of that assumption must be true. This form of argument is commonly known as a ‘reductio ad absurdum’ (or just a ‘reductio’ for short). In other words, you’re reducing the assumption to absurdity—then concluding the opposite. So, as always, let’s just consider some examples and maybe things will make more sense. 1. (A v B) (C D) 2. C ~D / ~A 3. | A AIP 4. | A v B 3 Add 5. | C D 1,4 MP 6. | C 5 Simp 7. | ~D 2,6 MP 8. | D 5 Simp 9. | D ~D 7,8 Conj 10. ~A 3-9 IP The same principles as with conditional proof are at work here. You make the assumption and put it out on a different scope line. Remember, you can’t pull anything
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course PHIL 2203 taught by Professor Barrett during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

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Examples 7.6 - Examples 7.6 Indirect Proof Again, like...

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