Examples 5.1

Examples 5.1 - 5.1 Notes In general, a syllogism is simply...

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5.1 Notes In general, a syllogism is simply a deductive argument consisting of two premises and a conclusion: If you don’t know what a syllogism is, then you shouldn’t be able to graduate. You don’t know what a syllogism is. Therefore, you shouldn’t be allowed to graduate! So, in a broad sense, a categorical syllogism is a deductive argument with two premises and a conclusion where each (of the propositions) is a categorical proposition. There must also be a total of three terms, each of which appear only twice in distinct propositions of the syllogism. Like the following: All soldiers are patriots. No traitors are patriots. Therefore, no traitors are soldiers. The three terms in the syllogism are given names depending on their location within the argument. First, there’s the major term : it is the predicate of the conclusion. In the above case, the major term is ‘soldiers’. Second, there’s the minor term : it’s the subject of the conclusion. In the above case, the minor term is ‘traitors’. Finally, there’s the middle term : it’s the term that doesn’t occur in the conclusion, but which appears in either premise. Here, that term is represented by ‘patriots’. The premises of the syllogism are also given names. The major premise is the one that contains the major term. The minor premise is the one that contains the minor term. In the above case (as will be the case for any categorical syllogism in standard form), the first premise is the major premise, and the second premise is the minor premise. As was the case for categorical propositions proper, there is a
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Examples 5.1 - 5.1 Notes In general, a syllogism is simply...

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