Examples 3.1

Examples 3.1 - Exercises 3.1 Informal Fallacies This may be...

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Exercises 3.1 Informal Fallacies This may be the most useful part of the course, because informal fallacies are perhaps the most pervasive fallacies you’ll see. They can be tricky to figure out, but we need to start by separating the formal from informal fallacies. In general, a fallacy is just a defect in an argument that consists in something other than false premises. (As you’ll remember, an argument with false premises cannot be sound/cogent—which is kind of what we’re looking for.) These problems are, so to say, deeper. There are two types: Formal fallacies —fallacies attributable to the form of the argument alone—the content of the arguments are meaningless. These fallacies only occur in deductive arguments. Formal Fallacies : All bullfights are grotesque rituals All executions are grotesque rituals So, all bullfights are executions. If apes are intelligent, then apes can solve puzzles. Apes can solve puzzles.
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course PHIL 2203 taught by Professor Barrett during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

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Examples 3.1 - Exercises 3.1 Informal Fallacies This may be...

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