Tracing the Silk Road

Tracing the Silk Road - Tracing the Silk Roads Megan...

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Unformatted text preview: Tracing the Silk Roads Megan Kettwig 10/17/07 K What wer e the Silk Roads? A network of ancient trade routes across the harsh terrain of central Asia They were the first routes that connected Eastern civilization with Western civilization. Connected Rome in the Western hemisphere with the Han Dynasty in the Eastern. Transported many goods such as: silk, laquerware, spices, pearls, horses, wool, linens, aromatics, glass, and precious stones. K Who Tr aveled the Silk Roads? Many different groups traveled these ancient routes. They came from distances as great as I taly like Marco Polo or Xuangzang, the Buddhist pilgrim, from China. Most popular though were the central Asians, the cameleers, tradesmen, farmers, and nomadic herders. K Fir st Per iod of the Silk Roads 200 BC - 400 CE Rose because of political and economical stability of Rome and China Nomadic people of central Asia greatly helped in buying and selling the goods. Because of the contact with new people, an epidemic swept the Eurasian Continent K Wenji's Abduction 195 CE - 207 CE A woman that was taken from her homeland by the Xangzu, a nomadic people. She was in captivity for 12 years During those 12 years she bore two children, from the captor husband. While traveling home she realized that she had fallen in love with her captor husband and that she missed her nomadic children. Her capture is noteworthy because it shows that during this time women were used as objects of desire, prizes of war, diplomatic hostages, and cross cultural mothers and lovers. This is a painting illustrating Wenji’s return to China, her home. K Jour ney of Faxian 399 CE - 413 CE Earliest Buddhist pilgrim Was pledged to a Buddhist monastery as an infant...
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2008 for the course HIST 121-HON taught by Professor Brookes during the Fall '08 term at SD State.

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Tracing the Silk Road - Tracing the Silk Roads Megan...

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