A50-Critical Analytical Response to Literary Texts -...

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Critical/Analytical Response to Literary TextsRead all parts of your assignment carefully and record your responses in the appropriate places.1.In this lesson, you were presented with a sample Critical/Analytical Response to Literary Texts question arising out of the Personal Response to Texts question that you've already completed. Following is a critical/analytical-response question based very closely on that one. The only difference isthat here you must base your response entirely on 25Reflect on the ideas and impressions you discussed in the Personal Response to Texts Assignment concerning the nature of individuals' responses to the changeable nature of life.Consider how our response to the changeable nature of life has been reflected and developed in The Bean Trees. Discuss the idea(s) the author develops about the impact of our response to the changeable nature of life.In planning and writing, consider the following instructions:As you develop your ideas, support them with appropriate, relevant, and meaningful examples from The Bean Trees.Carefully consider your controlling ideaor how you will create a strong unifying effectin your response.Compose a response to this question, simulating examination conditions as best you can. Give yourself up to two hours. Use your own paper for planning.
The Bean Trees DiscoveryA women can undertake a journey for many reasons: to escape, to seek a new way of life, to find adventure, to find love, to discover oneself or to simply keep moving. In the novel The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver, Taylor the main character sets off on a journey for all these reasons. On her journey to self-discovery Taylor Greer manages to overcome her weaknesses The beans that are continually revealed throughout the novel represent Taylor’s life. The earliest mention of the beanstook place when Taylor takes a close look at the reality of her life. “I had never done anything more interesting for a living than… picking bugs off somebody’s bean vines for a penny a piece.” (Pg. 4) The beans so far are a symbol of Taylor’s weaknesses, as she and the beans are both of poor quality. Subsequently, Taylor and Turtle are in the garden and…“For the next half hour she sat quietly between the squash hills, playing with her own beans. Finally she buried them there on the spot where they were all to be forgotten, until… a ferocious thicket of beans cam plowing up through the squashes.” (Pg. 89). Gradually, the beans are becoming of some significance in the novel, since they are truly beginning to echo Taylor’s life. Just as the beans did, Taylor begun her life without a great deal of impact on anyone, only to come plowing up and impact people where they did not expect it. At the end of the novel, the reader again encounters the beans for the last time. Although this time, the reader captures the complete significance of the beans. “Wisteria vines…thrive in poor soil…Their secret is something called rhizobia. These are microscopic bugs

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