Transitioning Fertilizer Effects on Brassica rapa to Californian Crop Production

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Madeleine JunevitchOctober 25, 2016Biology 106-15Final ReportTransitioning Fertilizer Effects of Height and Weight on Brassica rapa to Californian CropProductionBackground:Plants are both complex and simple. Like other eukaryotes, plants require basic necessities to sustain life: carbon dioxide, water, light for adenosine triphosphate production, and nutrients for growth, cell maintenance, and energy production. Yet as complex as they are, if plants are given what they need, they will grow. However, California’s water supplies are diminishing so it’s important to discover an optimal solution to maximize crop production, utilizing no more water than needed. The solution to maximize growth results lies with fertilizer, more specifically, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Plants draw these macronutrients fromtheir environment, increasing their availability will also increase plant biomass. A study in crop development in low nitrogen areas, crops were fertilized with magnesium to increase nitrogen uptake efficiency and overall optimizes crop yield environments, this is called 'magnesium-induced nitrogen uptake,'the optimal levels found for Zea mays are 58lbs/acre, (Grzebisz, 2013). Another study was conducted to test various water and nitrogen requirements on broccoli and cauliflower production in the deserts of Arizona while maximizing profits, this environment is very similar to that of California and suffers the same water shortage issue. However, the amounts of water and nitrogen for optimal growth varied little in contrast to the array of costs considered. This is due to yields in both crop and cost return already being substantially close to maximized profit. Sanchez found that maximum broccoli yields are

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