02 Week 2 Lecture Lines, Ropes, and Wires

02 Week 2 Lecture Lines, Ropes, and Wires - Lines Ropes...

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Lines, Ropes, & Wires NAUT 203 Seamanship I
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Lines and Ropes Marlinespike seamanship – “general term that covers all phases of rope (wire) work” (AMSM), including: Maintenance and care Handling of rope Knot tying, splicing Generally speaking smaller cordage is referred to as rope and larger cordage is referred to line
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Vocabulary – Refer to America Merchant Seaman’s Manual Ch 1 Small Stuff – describes cord less than 1 ¾. Bight – loop in the line/wire Bitter End – end of the line/wire Braid – plait or interwoven line, less likely to kink Cable – another name for wire rope Eye – A permanent loop in the end of a line/wire Line – rope aboard a vessel used for specific purpose Marlinespike – Tool that is tapered to a sharp point; used to separate strands or untie knots Marry – temporarily bind two lines together
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Types of Line (2.2A & 4.4.B) Natural Line is made from plant by product When wet line shrinks in length Never need to lubricate natural line Synthetic Line is made from man made product To open new spool of synthetic line unreel from the spool Sunlight greatly impairs the strength and durability
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Manila – Natural Line The strongest of the natural fibers Least resistance to mildew and rot of all natural line Even though manila is more resistant to dampness than other natural fibers, mariners should not stow it wet. This will increase rot
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Hemp – Natural Line Round line – small stuff of tarred hemp used for heavy service and seizing
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Cotton – Natural Line AKA “White Line” Soft and pliable Not a stronger natural line size for size Used primarily inside since it is sensitive to weather
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Nylon – Synthetic Line Normal safe working load is 25% of its breaking strain Critical point of elongation is about 40%, making it extremely dangerous After normal strain, Nylon will return to normal size when free of tension
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