paper5 - 1 Essay 5 Explication Do not go gentle into that good night Dylan Thomas is a Welsh poet from the 20th century One of his most famous works was

paper5 - 1 Essay 5 Explication Do not go gentle into that...

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1Essay 5 Explication: “Do not go gentle into that good night”Dylan Thomas is a Welsh poet from the 20thcentury. One of his most famous works was the villanelle, “Do not go gentle into that good night”, which contains Thomas’s paradoxof how to approach entering death. Thomas argues that those about to die should keep fighting against death, to not surrender or succumb to death in any way. The various aspects of “Do not go gentle into that good night” such as structure, imagery, diction, prosody, and syntax help to persuade the reader towards Thomas’s argument. In the first three lines of this poem, Thomas begins with a metaphor. He says, “Do not go gentle into that good night” (1), and is using the word “night” to signify death. This metaphor does a great deal in supporting his argument; nighttime can be described as dark and frightening, and pushes people to avoid death as long as they can. Line 2 directly describes Thomas’s paradox, “Old age should burn and rage at the end of the day” (2), saying that one should not rest when their time to die comes. This line also uses imagery to show how lively one should be at this time with the words “burn” and “rage”. In line 3, Thomas then uses another metaphor, “light”, to signify life, “Rage, rage against the dying of the light” (3). The rhyming between the two metaphors, “night” and “light” add rhythm and irony to this stanza, it is ironic that these two words, meaning opposite things, are rhyming. This rhyming pair brings up the large amount of contrast between life and death. Stanza 2 says explains that although wise people know death is inevitable, they should still not just fade into death, because they may have no accomplished enough. Line 5,“Because their words had forked no lightening they” (5), uses a great amount of imagery, using the lightening and fork as a metaphor for the expansion of the individual’s impact on the world. This reference to light is also supporting Thomas’s argument, that life is
Watsonequivalent to an electric shock, or lightening, and should be kept. Thomas ends this stanza

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