Language Loss[FINAL]

Language Loss[FINAL] - Tatsumi 1 Otto Tatsumi Professor...

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Tatsumi Otto Tatsumi Professor Linda M Bland-Stewart Ph.D. SPHR 72 October 28th 2007 Language Maintenance Cultures can maintain themselves under certain conditions. However its sustainability is completely depended on its surroundings. Terms such as Language Loss, Language Death, and Language Maintenance call for a weakening of culture and cultural assimilation. On rare occasions those assimilating cultures can form new ones by blending themselves together. Creolization, Diglossia, and Pidginization all signal for forming of new languages and new cultural identities. Language death and language loss all translate to roughly equal meanings. When cultures weaken and people in it are assimilated into the larger surroundings cultures lose its power. Eventually language loss or language death occurs because nobody in the community speaks their native tongue. The death of a language is a strong indicator that the culture is slowly disappearing or is being assimilated. Diglossia describes a situation where two variations of a language exist in the
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course SPHR 72 taught by Professor Bland-stewart during the Fall '08 term at GWU.

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Language Loss[FINAL] - Tatsumi 1 Otto Tatsumi Professor...

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