Stone Butch essay

Stone Butch essay - Sarah Levy February 28, 2005 Gender...

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Sarah Levy February 28, 2005 Gender Studies 210 Change Starts Here In the novel Stone Butch Blues, author Leslie Feinberg masterfully shows the precarious, undefined space in between binary gender system. Jess Goldberg, Feinberg’s transgender protagonist, struggles to find the freedom between man and woman, masculinity and femininity, butch and femme. At first, Jess defines herself as a “stone butch,” or a lesbian with masculine qualities who plays a specific role in a sexual relationship. But sheer cruelty, including workplace discrimination, police brutality, and societal marginalization, drives Jess to get a sex change. The need for survival, not choice, determined Jess’s decision to become transsexual. However, Jess’s ultimate fate as neither man nor woman demonstrates that her decision was only one of many on a journey to self discovery, and that transsexuality transcends gender to encompass race, ethnicity, and class struggles for rights. First, Jess decided to get a sex change because remaining a “stone butch” could have killed her. When she is trying to explain the decision to her girlfriend, Theresa, she
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course BUAD 305 taught by Professor Davila during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Stone Butch essay - Sarah Levy February 28, 2005 Gender...

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