Israeli Palestinian Conflict

Israeli Palestinian - The Modern Day Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Analyzed Through The Eyes Of Jesus Christ THEOLOGY 2205 Fr Stephen Biscko CM 1

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The Modern Day Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Analyzed Through The Eyes Of Jesus Christ THEOLOGY 2205 Fr. Stephen Biscko CM
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The Israeli – Palestinian conflict has been an ongoing dispute between the state of Israel and the Palestinians. Both nations have claims over the same area of land; mainly Jerusalem. It is the home of many holy sites based the Muslim, Jewish, and Christian religions, such as the Temple Mount, Joseph’s Tomb, and the Dome of the Rock. Both sides desire self-rule and a homeland in the area. While attempts are being made to broker a “two state solution”, the quest for peace has been plagued by war and tension between the two nations. One major source of conflict between Israel and Palestine is conflicting promises made by the British to each side of the establishment of independent nations in the region during the World War I period. The Hussein-McMahon Correspondence (1915 – 1916) was an exchange of letters between Hussein Bin Ali, Sharif of Mecca, and Sir Henry McMahon (British High Commissioner in Egypt). During World War I, the British encouraged the Arabs to revolt against the, then ruling, Ottoman Empire. They promised support for Arab Independence. However, following the war, Britain received control over the region of Palestine in 1919 through the League of Nations and claimed Palestine as their own; which was included in the regions excluded for consideration towards independence. This was viewed as a betrayal by the Arabs who felt that the promise had been made in good faith (1). The conflict was perpetuated by the Balfour Declaration of 1917, which supported plans for the creation of a Jewish “national home” within Palestine. This agreement supported the Zionists, a Jewish nationalist movement, with the condition that nothing should be done to prejudice non-Jewish communities already present within the region. 2
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However, the wording of this document was also ambiguous and it has been argued that the British supported a homeland for the Jews in Palestine, not a separate nation-state. From that time, the quest for peace in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been an ongoing process. Since the 1970’s, there have been numerous efforts between both nations and negotiators, like the United States and the United Nations, to find terms that will bring about peace. For example, at the Middle East Peace Summit at Camp David, held in July 2000, both nations agreed that they needed to negotiate in order to put an end to decades of conflict. The four main obstacles both nations aimed at resolving were the issues of territory, Jerusalem and Temple Mount, refugees, and Israeli security concerns. Both sides committed themselves to continue their efforts to conclude an agreement on
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course THE 2205 taught by Professor Bicsko during the Spring '08 term at St. Johns Duplicate.

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Israeli Palestinian - The Modern Day Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Analyzed Through The Eyes Of Jesus Christ THEOLOGY 2205 Fr Stephen Biscko CM 1

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