15%20lecture%20SUSTAINABILITY-2

15%20lecture%20SUSTAINABILITY-2 - ECOSYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY...

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ECOSYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY AND CONDITION
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BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ECOSYSTEMS P ECOSYSTEMS: C HAVE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION A EXHIBIT TROPHIC STRUCTURE A VARY IN RESILIENCY TO DISTURBANCE
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ECOSYSTEMS ARE OPEN SYSTEMS P THE FUNCTIONING OF ECOSYSTEMS ARE DEPENDENT UPON: C SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT FOR EXCHANGE OF MATERIALS A ENERGY INPUT AND RELEASE OF DISSIPATIVE ENERGY A COLONIZATION OF SPECIES
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THEREFORE: P THE MANAGEMENT OF A PARTICULAR ECOSYSTEM MUST BE COGNIZANT OF THE VARIOUS DEPENDENCIES IT HAS WITH OTHER ECOSYSTEMS AND THE SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT.
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MANAGEMENT SIGNIFICANCE P ECOSYSTEMS CANNOT BE PROPERLY MANAGED WITHOUT CONSIDERING THE LARGER ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH THE ECOSYSTEM IS EMBEDDED. EACH PARTICULAR ECOSYSTEM IS LINKED TO OTHER ECOSYSTEMS IN THE LANDSCAPE CONTEXT.
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MANAGEMENT SIGNIFICANCE P SURPRISES, UNEXPECTED RESULTS AND THRESHOLD RESPONSES WILL OCCUR. THEREFORE, MANAGEMENT DECISIONS THAT COULD RESULT IN LARGE AND RAPID CHANGES TO ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS SHOULD BE AVOIDED AND REPLACED BY SEQUENCES OF DECISIONS THAT WILL HAVE SMALLER, INCREMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE ECOSYSTEM.
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SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS P SPATIAL VARIATION, OR HETEROGENEITY, AFFECTS BIODIVERSITY BY CREATING MORE POSSIBILITIES FOR NICHE PARTITIONING
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SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION P HIGH LEVELS OF SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY IN AN ECOSYSTEM OFTEN LEAD TO MORE SPECIES CO- EXISTING AND STRONGER BUFFERING AGAINST POPULATION EXTINCTIONS THAT WOULD OTHERWISE RESULT FROM LOCAL FOOD LOSSES OR HABITAT DESTRUCTION.
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MANAGEMENT SIGNIFICANCE P THE NORMAL RANGES OF VARIATION SHOULD NOT BE EXCEEDED NOR SHOULD THE ECOSYSTEM BE UNDULY CONSTRAINED AND VARIANCE LIMITED.
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10 MANAGEMENT SIGNIFICANCE P UNDULY CONSTRAINING VARIATION WILL LEAD TO CATASTROPHIC CHANGES, E.G., SUPPRESSING NATURAL FIRES LEADS TO DESTRUCTIVE WILDFIRES, CONTROLLING NORMAL FLOOD STAGES LEADS TO CATASTROPHIC FLOODS IN UNUSUALLY WET YEARS.
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MANAGEMENT SIGNIFICANCE P IDEALLY, A MANAGED ECOSYSTEM SHOULD ENCLOSE SUFFICIENT SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY, IN THE FORM OF ALTERNATIVE HABITATS, SEASONAL
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course RLEM RLEM 301 taught by Professor Knight during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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15%20lecture%20SUSTAINABILITY-2 - ECOSYSTEM SUSTAINABILITY...

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