7-3 OTHER KINDS OF PRONOUNS - OTHER KINDS OF PRONOUNS Apply...

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OTHER KINDS OF PRONOUNSApply yourself to learning the names of other kinds of pronouns and how they are used.Here is your goal for this lesson:Distinguish six different types and uses of pronounsOther kinds of pronouns.1. Some pronouns are formed by adding -selfor -selvesto the personal pronoun forms:myself, itself, yourself, themselves. This compound form is called reflexivewhen it refers back to the subject of the sentence.Reflexive:I hurt myself.The cat cleaned itself.Did you burn yourself?The children fed themselves.2. When this form of the pronoun is used to emphasize the antecedent, it is called an intensivepronoun. (Remember that the antecedent is the word to which the pronoun refers; the noun that the pronoun is replacing.)Intensive:Idid it myself.Did youbake it yourself?Hepainted it by himself. I spoke to the Presidenthimself.3.Interrogativepronouns are used to question. Imagine how awkward it would be to aska question without the help of these pronouns.Interrogative:Whorang the bell? Whichis your favorite? Whatdo you want? Whoseis this?4.Demonstrative pronounspoint out certain things. These pronouns demonstrate which thing is being referred to in a passage just as you might point to an actual object if you were speaking to someone. Be sure to use these pronouns carefully so that they refer to a particular noun.Demonstrative:Thisis the program. Thesewere left out.
Thatseems reasonable. Thosecame with the set.5. Indefinite pronounsrefer to no special person or thing.Overuse of these pronouns may result in vagueness.Indefinite:anyonebothnobodyeverythingmanyeverybodyanythingoneeveryoneeachno oneothers6. Relative pronounsbegin dependent clauses. A relative pronoun relates a dependent clause to a noun or a pronoun that precedes it in the sentence. Use who, whom,or thatto refer to persons. Use whichor thatto refer to things.Relative:I saw the boy whowon the race.Where is the book thatI loaned you?Do you know the author about whomwe are talking?Please take the suitcase whichis in the hall.Learn More about Pronouns.Personal PronounsUnlike English nouns, which usually do not change form except for the addition of an -s ending to create the plural or the apostrophe + s to create the possessive, personal pronouns (which stand for persons or things) change form according to their various uses within a sentence.Thus I is used as the subject of a sentence (I am happy.), me is used as an object in various ways (He hit me. He gave me a book. Do this for me.), and my is used as the possessive form (That's my car.) The same is true of the other personal pronouns: the singular you and he/she/it and the plural we, you, and they. These forms are called cases. An easily printable chart is available that shows the various Cases of the Personal Pronouns.

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