Documents -- Women's rights

Documents -- Women's rights - Feminism 1 THE MOVEMENT FOR...

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Feminism THE MOVEMENT FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS Visionary intellectuals such as Marx believed that technological progress and industrialization would promote equality between the sexes, but the French and the Industrial Revolutions had a number of consequences harmful to that cause. Wherever new “rights of the citizen” were achieved, they were initially confined to men. Wherever factory industry supplanted the old household economy, a geographical separation of work and family life resulted, and married women found it far more difficult to move back and forth between economic activities and child-rearing. More and more professions defined strict educational qualifications in the early nineteenth century—doctor, lawyer, engineer, scientist, civil servant—and women initially had no chance to enter any of them. European culture was also dominated by a wide variety of medical, psychiatric, religious, and sociological arguments, echoed by all the experts in their respective fields, that justified inequality between the sexes. All this began to change in the 1880s and ‘90s. The following documents are designed to give some sense of how anger spread among women of the middle and upper classes over being denied most of the educational and career opportunities open to men, of how feminist organizations arose and spread, of the tense relationship between socialism and feminism, and of the strategic dilemmas which faced the pioneering feminists around the year 1900. Ask yourself as you read these debates from a century ago which of these issues have been resolved in the contemporary world, and which remain contentious. THE MOVEMENT FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS .............................................................................................. 1 #. 1 The Diary of Marie Bashkirtseff (1887). ........................................................................................ 2 #. 2 THE DEBATE OVER SECONDARY EDUCATION. . ........................................................................ 5 #. 3 The Erfurt Program of the German Social Democratic Party (1891):. ............................................... 9 #. 4 Lily Braun, Memoirs of a Socialist (1909-1911). . ............................................................................ 12 #. 5 The Program of the League of German Women’s Clubs (1907). .................................................... 19 #. 6 Emmeline Pankhurst, My Own Story (1914). . ................................................................................. 22 #. 7 Critics of the militant tactics of the WSPU. ...................................................................................... 27 #. 8 Dr. Madeleine Pelletier, “The Right to Abortion” (1911). .................................................................. 30 1
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Feminism #. 1 The Diary of Marie Bashkirtseff (1887). Mariya Konstantinova Bashkirtseva (1860-1884) was a wealthy young Russian noblewoman who
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Bidlack during the Spring '08 term at Washington and Lee.

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Documents -- Women's rights - Feminism 1 THE MOVEMENT FOR...

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