3117156155 - Assessing Body Composition Objective: To...

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Assessing Body Composition Objective: To provide an understanding of the concepts, principles and techniques involved in the determination of body composition
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% Body Fat and Health Obesity is a serious health problem that increases one’s risk for disease Too little body fat also poses health risks Some commonly used measures don’t take body composition into account (BMI, height/weight tables) Obesity is better defined as an excessive amount of total body fat for a given body weight
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Recommended %BF For Adults NR LOW MID UPPER OBESITY Males 18-34 <8 8 13 22 >22 35-55 <10 10 18 25 >25 55+ <10 10 16 23 >23 Females 18-34 <20 20 28 35 >35 35-55 <25 25 32 38 >38 55+ <25 25 30 35 >35
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Recommended %BF For Physically Active Adults LOW MID UPPER Males 18-34 5 10 15 35-55 7 11 18 55+ 9 12 18 Females 18-34 16 23 28 35-55 20 27 33 55+ 20 27 33 But, recommended values differ with activity status
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Why Measure Body Fat? Identify health risks associated with high/low levels of fat Identify clients with excessive accumulation of abdominal fat Education To monitor changes in body composition To formulate dietary and exercise recommendations To assess effectiveness of those recommendations To estimate weight loss goals
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Body Composition Models To study body composition, body weight is divided into 2 or more components Two-Component Model body divided into fat and fat-free mass (FFM)
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Assumptions of the Two-Component Model Density of fat is 0.901 g/cc Density of FFM is 1.10 g/cc Density of fat and FFM is the same for all individuals Densities of tissues comprising FFM are constant and their proportional contribution is constant Individuals differ from reference body only in the amount of fat they have The two-component model provides an accurate estimate of %BF if all assumptions are met - however expect some measurement error
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course KIN 325 taught by Professor Ward during the Spring '07 term at Rhode Island.

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3117156155 - Assessing Body Composition Objective: To...

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