Designing Resistance Training Programs

Designing Resistance Training Programs - Designing...

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Designing Resistance Training Programs Objective: To review the basic principles of designing a safe and effective muscle conditioning program.
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Introduction Resistance training is an integral part of an adult fitness program Resistance training should be of sufficient intensity to enhance muscular strength and endurance, FFM and BMD Resistance training results in increased performance ranging from ADLs to athletic endeavors
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Types of Resistance Training Static (isometric) Dynamic (isotonic; involves concentric and eccentric contractions) Isokinetic
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Basic Principles Intensity - can be expressed 3 ways Absolute – the amount of weight Relative – the % of 1RM The RM - the max weight a person can lift for a given number of reps General rules of intensity Light weight, high reps improves endurance Heavier weights, low reps improves strength BUT … Strength and endurance can be developed simultaneously over a wide range of reps Intensity is inversely related to repetitions
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Basic Principles Set - consists of a given number of consecutive repetitions of the exercise Progressive Overload – For improvements to occur, the stress placed on the muscle during exercise must gradually increase increase resistance, reps, or volume change repetition speed rest periods shortened or lengthened
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Specificity of Training Training adaptations are specific to the stimulus applied muscle actions involved, speed of movement, range of motion, muscle groups trained, energy systems involved intensity or volume of training. Training Volume - measures total amount of weight
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course KIN 325 taught by Professor Ward during the Spring '07 term at Rhode Island.

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Designing Resistance Training Programs - Designing...

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