Lab E9 - McGee 1 Lab E9 AC Circuits: Reactance and...

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McGee 1 Lab E9 AC Circuits: Reactance and Resonance Allison McGee Mr. Fedorchak Thursday 2:00- 4:50pm Partners: Stevie Whitehead
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McGee 2 Abstract : The purpose of this lab was to study the behavior of inductors and capacitors in an AC circuit and determine the resonance frequency of an RLC circuit. The theoretical resonance frequency is 11253.95 Hz. Our experimental resonance frequency is 11330 Hz. This gave us a percent difference of .6%. Introduction : In previous labs involving RC and RL circuits, we have learned about the behavior of inductors, capacitors and resistors. As you remember, inductors are small coils of wire, usually wrapped around some ferromagnetic material to enhance their ability to resist large plates of metal separated by a thin layer of insulating medium, which allows the plates to store and electric charge. In an alternating (AC) current, these two components do not so much “resist” the current flowing in a circuit, but “react” to it. The reactance of these components in an AC circuit is given in the following expressions. The reactance of a capacitor (Xc) in units of Ohms is given by: Xc=1/2 pfc (Equation 1) where C is the magnitude of the capacitor in Farads and f is the frequency of the driving current or voltage in Hertz. The reactance of the inductor (XL) in units of Ohms is given by: XL=2 pfL (Equation 2) where f is the frequency of the driving current of voltage, L is the magnitude of the inductor in Henries. Since the frequency appears in different positions in each of these expressions for the inductor and the capacitor, and increase in frequency has the exact opposite effect on each of these reactances. At high frequencies, the capacitor has little effect on the circuit while the inductor is seen to dominate. At low frequencies, the
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McGee 3 component’s reactances reverse their behavior, and the capacitor dominates the AC
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Lab E9 - McGee 1 Lab E9 AC Circuits: Reactance and...

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