Short Research Essay Outline

Short Research Essay Outline - Abbi Porter Professor Byock...

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Abbi Porter Professor Byock English 110 – College Writing 21 October 2016 Monsters in Beowulf May Be More Than We Know What do scholars believe the monsters in Beowulf may symbolize, exist for, and what have we yet to learn about their part in the tale? The mythical beasts that haunt the dreams of the Geats in Beowulf have been analyzed by scholars to represent more than just wild creatures that need to be killed. The greatest scholarly opinion of monsters is that: The human mind is laced with repressed emotions that we cast onto monsters; by creating monsters with undesirable human characteristics—such as envy, revenge, and selfishness —we are able to justify them within ourselves, which also makes us fear them. 1 Monsters have been said to be a personification of our fears, related to Christianity for the idea of good vs. evil, and to our past expressing how our society has portrayed them differently over time. Scholars have dug for evidence, in the book and in our history, that has proven this argument to be true. Over time of theorizing the symbolism of the monsters in Beowulf , one common conclusion scholars have come across is that the monsters “are uncontrollable creatures of the human imagination, inspiring fear through their gigantic stature; composition of repressed emotions within one’s self.” 2 Stephen Asma specifies on monsters not only representing our 1 Bailey, Ashlee. "Monsters: Classic to Contemporary Symbols." Culture Society and Praxis 7.1 (2008): 9. Web. 2 Ibid., 8. 1
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fears, but how we fight them also symbolizing how we face our fears. 3 This conceives the thought that the monsters in Beowulf are the fears of the people who then need Beowulf to protect them and then the Dragon being a personified fear of Beowulf’s. From this, monsters not only represent our internal fears and locked emotions but show our fears through growth as well. Ashlee Bailey supports this by saying “Monsters are gigantic, uncontrollable creatures, and to continue inciting fear within our hearts by threatening our sense of security, the monsters of our childhood must grow with us.” 4 Bartz is one of the many who agrees that the monsters symbolize emotions and fears in one’s mind. She mentions the personified emotions more on the Dragon for being “not just a
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