2-26 - Suburban Development in the Unites States Railroad...

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Suburban Development in the Unites States Railroad and street car suburbs (1815-1915) o Influx of immigrants o Anti-urban bias in American culture o Wealthy people wanted to live near city center o When transportation allowed them to get to work they too moved to suburbs o Trolley caused sudden jump o Didn’t think suburbs constituted a threat to cities economically Automobile Suburbs (1918-1945) o Arrival of automobile o Possible for rapidly expanding middle class to move to suburbs o Allowed to suburbanize areas in between railroad lines o 1920s suburbs began to outpace cities in terms of growth This coincides with the fact that proportion of factory employment began to decline in this period and it was more likely outside central cities due to increased demand for large amounts of land Bedroom (Postwar) Suburbs (1946-1970) Multi-ethnic suburbs and residential enclaves (1970s-The Present) The Making of Postwar/Bedroom Suburbs: The Key Factors Automobile Road and highway construction Increase in birthrates and accompanying housing shortage Mass production techniques for home construction Long term, low down-payment mortgages Cultural dislike of cities Features of the Postwar Suburbs Peripheral location Low density o Spread out homes Less opportunity for social capital, especially for women who didn’t work Economic divide because of higher property values
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course POLI_SCI 250 taught by Professor Roberts during the Winter '08 term at Northwestern.

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2-26 - Suburban Development in the Unites States Railroad...

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