Senior Project

Senior Project - AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF ROMAN GLASS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF ROMAN GLASS MARISA MEISNER MAY 2008 A SENIOR PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-LA CROSSE
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract Glass, in its natural form, has been used since the Stone Age, but it wasn’t until about 3000 B.C., after the Phoenicians inadvertently “discovered” glass, that glassmaking techniques were developed and manufactured glass became an important part of human culture. In ancient times, people were conscious both of its utility and of its beauty. It was the Romans, however, who refined the art of glass working, adding to its utilization. Their established trade networks ensured its trafficking throughout Europe, Asia, and Africa. Several archaeological sites, as discussed in this paper, hold clues as to how glass was made and why it was so widely used and, in the beginning of its production, so highly prized. 2
Background image of page 2
Introduction Since the beginning of their discovery and invention, both natural and manufactured glasses have become an integral part of our culture. W.B. Honey believes that, “Glass nowadays is too familiar to arouse all the wonder it deserves” (MacFarlane 2002). In the past, people were aware of its beauty as well as its utility. Natural glass is formed when certain types of rocks melt as a result of high-temperature events, such as volcanic eruptions, lightning strikes, or the impact of meteorites. The rock then cools quickly and solidifies. Natural glasses include obsidian, which is a natural glass made from the lava of a volcanic eruption, and tektites, which are naturally formed extraterrestrial glass (Glass Online 2007). Though the Phoenicians originally discovered glass, the Romans were the people who made it into the art it is today. Their glass working techniques advanced the practice to make glass a prized possession, originally available only to high ranking officials. Eventually, as glass spread across the well-defined Roman trade routes, glassmaking and working techniques expanded throughout the Roman Empire. Various items became more readily available to the general public. Glass was used more frequently and more commonly. Though the original glass stock has only been found at two known sites in the Roman Empire, Beit She’arim and Beit Eliezer, both in Israel, it was worked and refined into vessels and other articles at numerous sites throughout the Empire (Fleming 1997). This paper seeks to discuss the spread of Roman glass, as well as glassmaking and working technologies throughout the Roman Empire and the rest of the known world at that time (1 st century B.C. - 7 th century A.D.). It also discusses two of the only known sites of Roman glassmaking and describes the different types of glass produced by the 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Romans. These topics are imperative to learning about glass and the Roman Empire, as both played an integral part in the forming of each others histories. Methodology
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course ARC 499 taught by Professor Theler during the Spring '08 term at Wisc La Crosse.

Page1 / 36

Senior Project - AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF ROMAN GLASS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online