LU7+Revision (1) - Food Production Study Unit 7 eTutor...

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Food Production Study Unit 7 eTutor Revision
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Learning Outcomes After completing this study unit, you should be able to Explain the relationship between food, population numbers and technology Explain the development of agriculture through the three agricultural revolutions Describe the change in agricultural systems in the last 200 years Explain what the Green Revolution and the Blue Revolution entail and their impact Discuss and explain the spatial distribution of hunger in the world Describe the impact of food production on the natural environment Explain why it is necessary to practice sustainable agriculture
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Agricultural Change The history of food production is as old as human existence – after all, we have always had to eat! The earliest humans, Homo sapiens , were hunter gatherers. Humans sustained their food intakes in these ways for over 100,000 years. Hunter gatherer communities lived at low population densities so their food needs could be met by these basic methods.
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Neolithic Revolution The Neolithic Revolution was the change from the nomadic hunter gatherer communities to settler communities who farmed their foods. This move towards agriculture allowed communities to have a more predictable food source, with a higher calorie content from a smaller land area. A move towards agriculture and food production management gave rise to civilisations, such as the Ancient Egyptians, approximately 4000-3500BC.
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A large part of the Neolithic Revolution was the domestication of animals and plants. Domestication is the selective breeding and cultivation of wild animals and plants to best meet the needs for food production and domestic uses. Over time the characteristics desired by human civilisations, which were selectively bred into these plants and animals, made them unable to exist as ‘wild’ plants or animals. For example, the large edible wheat seeds which were selectively bred as a food source meant that the natural dispersal mechanism of the seed was lost and the plant became dependent on the farmers for survival.
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It was the Neolithic Revolution, and the beginning of agricultural management that started the exponential growth of the human population.
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