Naming compounds - Naming compounds: First look to see if...

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Naming compounds: First look to see if you have a metal bound to a nonmetal or a nonmetal bound to a nonmetal. Metals DO NOT bond to each other. The metals are the elements to the left of the black staircase on the periodic table on the front cover of your book. Hydrogen can act as both a metal and a nonmetal, experience tells when it’s acting like what. If you have a nonmetal bound to a nonmetal you are going to use the prefixes to name your compound (this is a covalent compound). You do not need to use ‘mono’ if it is the first element but you do need to use it all other times (ex. CO = carbon monoxide NOT monocarbon monoxide). If have a metal (most likely going to be the first element written) and it is NOT a transition metal (i.e it is group I, II, or III). You are going to name the cation first (the metal) and then the anion (the nonmetal). You will not use roman numerals because these metals can only have one charge. (CaBr 2 = Calcium Bromide NOT Calcium (II) bromide. You do not use the prefixes for ionic compounds (metal + nonmetal). If the
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2008 for the course CHEMISTY 101 taught by Professor Denofrio during the Summer '07 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Naming compounds - Naming compounds: First look to see if...

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