10_4 Notes - 10/4 - Notes - Social Orders and Non-elites A...

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10/4 - Notes - Social Orders and Non-elites A social order consists most simply of the occupational statuses that make up a society’s work organization, together with family and other dependency statuses related to this work organization, e.g. retired or disabled persons exempted from work, students training for work. People get frustrated/impulsive/hostile when they can’t find work. They are not inherently irrational, but may act in irrational ways b/c they can’t find anything meaningful to do (no rational alternatives). Ex. Slave holding society – the typical slave has very few if any courses of action that would improve their circumstances through rational behavior. What do you do? You act irrational, play the fool in front of the master or maybe explode in a futile burst of violence/anger. Ex. When the Feudal order in Europe was breaking up, people were being pushed off of land, but with no place to go and earn a livelihood. A whole mass of people displaced – beggary, thieves, burglars, banditry, etc. The society is going to be very political and very violent unless they have an organized system of statuses so that people know their place and what is expected of them. A strong social order provides most people with rational alternatives. -
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10_4 Notes - 10/4 - Notes - Social Orders and Non-elites A...

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