Article 3- An Italian is a Dago

Article 3- An Italian is a Dago - When Italians immigrants...

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When Italians immigrants first arrived to the U.S. they were viewed as people without skill and of little intelligence. Italian men were known as Dago’s, an unskilled, unlettered, and poverty-stricken slum dweller, and were not considered white. For the majority of these Italian immigrants, emigration was their only hope for improving their lives. Three basic factors were responsible for emigration from their homeland: “destitution, lack of work, and a natural desire to improve their condition. Italians soon became known for their seasonal nature. They would find jobs that were suitable certain times of the year, and would migrate to other places such as Latin America to do different jobs when seasons changed and other jobs became suitable. More than 95 percent of the Italian immigrants arrived in New York City and most remained there or moved to urban-industrial centers nearby. Early immigrants soon became a custom to American conditions and practices, and were soon able to look after themselves and help future immigrants. Family incomes rose when Italian males began sending for their families, and their wives and
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Article 3- An Italian is a Dago - When Italians immigrants...

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