180F008 - Contractarianism: Locke Class Objectives To...

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Contractarianism: Locke
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Class Objectives To understand Locke’s theory of the legitimacy of government To contrast Locke’s theory with Hobbes’ To see how Locke’s theory informs U.S. political system To gain further understanding of contractarianism as political theory
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Locke’s Second Treatise of Government First Treatise is argument against divine right of kings Second Treatise argues for origin and legitimacy of civil gov’t Legitimacy requires consent of the governed
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State of Nature Perfect freedom (but not license to kill oneself) Equality in the sense of no natural subordination or subjection Humans guided by reason Two rights and duties: to preserve ourselves and punish transgressors
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Beginning of Political Society Persons enter society only by consent Once persons join they must abide by the will of the majority Objections no actual instances of consent no opportunity for persons born in society
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course PHIL 180 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '07 term at Kansas.

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180F008 - Contractarianism: Locke Class Objectives To...

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