Bio 3 Project

Bio 3 Project - Biology 3 PowerPoint Project Rene Arreola...

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Biology 3 PowerPoint Project Rene Arreola 08/03/2007 Spicci
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There are representatives from 4  different plant communities in this  presentation: Foothill woodland,  riparian, chaparral, and mixed conifer.   These communities are located in the  nearby Sierra Nevada mountains and  the foothills that flank them.
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Foothill Woodland The lowest communities on the Western  slope of the Sierras are the Foothill  woodlands.  In certain areas, any and  all elevations between 500-5,000 ft. are  generally considered to be within this  region.  Several varieties of oak, pine,  shrubs, and grasses abound in areas  where the soil allows.  The higher  elevations of this belt are especially  abundant with Ponderosa Pine and  Black Oak.
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Interior Live Oak Quercus wislizneii
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Interior Live Oak continued Can reach anywhere from 30-75 ft. in  height, with dark-colored, crevassed  bark found on mature trees Found at 2,000-5,000 ft. elevations,  typically in stream bottoms, slopes, and  also in low quality soils Provides shelter for birds, insects, and  other animals
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California Buckeye Aesculus californica
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California Buckeye continued Alternatively known as the Horse  chestnut This species of tree can grow to  anywhere from 10-45 ft. tall, and has  relatively smooth, gray bark Found at elevations as high as 5,000 ft.  near streams and on hillsides Unique in that it enters a stage of  dormancy during the hot summer  months
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Blue Oak Quercus douglasii
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Blue Oak continued The Blue Oak typically reaches heights  anywhere from 20-60 ft. and has scaly,  white bark Common at altitudes up to 3,000 ft.  especially on grassy or rocky slopes Birds like the Western Scrub Jay, Ash- throated Flycatcher, and Nuttall's  Woodpecker prefer the Blue Oak
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Western Redbud Cercis occidentalis
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Western Redbud continued The Western Redbud shrub generally  reaches heights of 8-20 ft. and has  smooth, heart-shaped leaves It is typically found at any elevation  below 5,000 ft. along streams and on 
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course BIO 3 taught by Professor Spicci during the Summer '07 term at Reedley.

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Bio 3 Project - Biology 3 PowerPoint Project Rene Arreola...

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