Moral Foundations of Politics Slides

Moral Foundations of Politics Slides - Moral Foundations of...

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Unformatted text preview: Moral Foundations of Politics Slides John Locke: The early enlightenment (1632-1704) The Early Enlightenment and Scientific Certainty: Of arts, some are demonstrable, others indemonstrable; and demonstrable are those the construction of the subject whereof is in the power of the artist himself, who, in his demonstration, does no more but deduce the consequences of his own operation. The reason whereof is this, that the science of every subject is derived from a precognition of the causes, generation, and construction of the same; and consequently where the causes are known, there is place for demonstration, but not where the causes are to seek for. Geometry therefore is demonstrable, for the lines and figures from which we reason are drawn and described by ourselves; and civil philosophy is demonstrable, because we make the commonwealth ourselves. But because of natural bodies we know not the construction, but seek it from the effects, there lies no demonstration of what the causes be we seek for, but only of what they may be. Thomas Hobbes, Six Lessons to the Professors of Mathematics (1656) The Workmanship Ideal: The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions: for men being all the workmanship of one omnipotent, and infinitely wise maker; all the servants of one sovereign master, sent into the world by his order, and about his business; they are his property, whose workmanship they are, made to last during his, not one another's pleasure: and being furnished with like faculties, sharing all in one community of nature, there cannot be supposed any such subordination among us, that may authorize us to destroy one another, as if we were made for one another's uses, as the inferior ranks of creatures are for ours. From Second Treatise of Government (1690) Locke and the centrality of individual rights: Sources of individual rights- Workmanship Equality in the eyes of God. Contra Filmer Theory of biblical hermeneutics and deep pluralism. Pluralism, toleration, and the right to resist: The care of souls cannot belong to the civil magistrate, because his power consists only in outward force; but true and saving religion consists in the inward persuasion of the mind, without which nothing can be acceptable to God. And such is the nature of the understanding, that it cannot be compelled to the belief of anything by outward force. Confiscation of estate, imprisonment, torments, nothing of that nature can have any such efficacy as to make men change the inward judgment that they have framed of things....
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2008 for the course PLSC 118 taught by Professor Ianshapiro during the Spring '07 term at Yale.

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Moral Foundations of Politics Slides - Moral Foundations of...

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