v8n2_GoodwinS[1] - M AT H E M AT IC A L TO OL S FOR T H E R E A L WOR L D A F ou n dat ions L e a r n i ng E x pe r i e nc e i n Qua n t i tat i v e R e

v8n2_GoodwinS[1] - M AT H E M AT IC A L TO OL S FOR T H E R...

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a u t u m n 2 0 0 8 33 MATHEMATICAL TOOLS FOR THE R EAL WOR LD: a Foundations Learning experience in Quantitative reasoning K. Shane Goodwin—Department of Mathematics M idstream in the transition to the BYU I daho Foundations program, I find it helpful to reflect on our progress with FDMAT 108, Mathematics for the Real World, and articulate some of the challenges and insights that have emerged so far in designing the curriculum. I will summarize the philosophy and curricular objectives of this course, which fulfills the quantitative reasoning requirement in Foundations. In the process, I hope to illuminate some of the work behind the scenes by many colleagues in the Mathematics Department. In addition, I hope my description of the options for different groups of students will help advisors, department chairs, and deans to understand the direction we are taking in FDMAT 108. We hope that students will now have a richer Foundations experience even if they choose the test-out option, to be described below. The test-out option allows students who will take more advanced quantitative reasoning courses in Foundations (such as college algebra, calculus, statistics, etc.) to still have a significant learning experience with the course objectives covered in Math 108. We have a long way to go in the refinement process of both the course and its test-out option, so this article has a tentative quality not too different from the confidence and sense of progress we members of the FDMAT 108 team have felt. Although I have served as the Math 108 Committee Chair for more than ten years, Kent Bessey was the original team leader for FDMAT 108 , and I am indebted to him for getting us onto solid footing. In addition to his personal leadership, he made significant contributions to our FDMAT 108 resource web page. (To see these pages, which remain under development, see .) This site serves both students and faculty involved in FDMAT 108 classes, with links to electronic resources, study guides, and general information about the class. It also introduces the quantitative reasoning requirements of Foundations to students who will choose the test-out option. Our other committee members, Jennie Youngberg, Richard Pieper, Jackie Nygaard (Mathematics Department), and Chris Andrews (Business Department) have provided valuable assistance and suggestions along the way. Finally, Paul Cox, the Mathematics Department chair, continues to play a vital role as we review and refine this Foundations course. We hope that students will now have a richer Foundations experience.
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3 4 • p e r s p e c t i v e — a u t u m n 2 0 0 8 HistoricaL Overview oF Mathematics Gr aduation R eQuirements In the Winter 2001 issue of Perspective , I wrote about our transition to the new mathematics graduation requirement that coincided with the conversion from Ricks College to BYU I daho.1 I briefly borrow key points of that historical overview to inform newer faculty of the evolution of our G.E . mathematics curriculum.
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