Taste of Cherry - Paras Shah Professor Djabini Movie Review...

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Paras Shah Professor Djabini Movie Review 03/08/08
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Abbas Kiarostami is the most influential and controversial post-revolutionary Iranian filmmaker and one of the most highly celebrated directors in the international film community of the last decade. Abbas Kiarostami’s “Taste of Cherry” portrays Mr. Badii as a middle-aged man wishing to kill himself; driving his Range Rover across the outskirts of Tehran, he searches for someone to aid him in his final hours, someone who will agree to bury his body if he succeeds in his mission; a planned overdose of sleeping pills or rescue him if he fails. Badii encounters citizens from every walk of life; a trash collector, a soldier, and a seminarian, all of whom refuse to help him, either out of a sense of religion or personal morality. Offering a large sum of money in exchange for services rendered, he first picks up a Kurdish soldier who ultimately flees in fear upon learning of Badii's plan. The next passenger, an Afghani seminary student, instead attempts to convince him of the sanctity of human life. Finally, Badii picks up a Turkish taxi driver who reluctantly agrees to check the body for signs of life; having long ago contemplated suicide himself, the taxi driver also tries to dissuade Badii from ending it all. The taxi driver accepts the offer only because he needs the money to care for his sick son. Kiarostami's refusal to answer the film's two most obvious questions; exactly why does Mr. Badii wish to end his life, and does he successfully carry out his plan? This intrigues viewers and allows them to share in his protagonist's dilemma by triggering their own powers of imagination. The meandering pace of the film gently unfurls in a series of encounters and dialogues that form its core, revealing the character not only of Badii, but also of Iranians and humans in general. Abbas Kiarostami was born June 22, 1940 in Tehran and studied at the Tehran University School of Fine Arts. Kiarostami was one of the few directors who remained in
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Iran after the 1979 revolution, when many of his fellow Iranian filmmakers and directors fled to the west. He is an internationally acclaimed Iranian film director, screenwriter, and film producer. An active filmmaker since 1970, Kiarostami has been involved in over forty films, including shorts and documentaries. Kiarostami was awarded the prestigious Palme d’Or (Golden Palm) award at the Cannes International Film Festival in 1997 for his film, Taste of Cherry . Taste of
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2008 for the course MIDEAST ST 334 taught by Professor Djabini during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Taste of Cherry - Paras Shah Professor Djabini Movie Review...

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