Elsewhere - Kedlyne Demosthene Wood English Composition 102 Formal Paper#2 Elsewhere The purpose of a setting in a piece of literature helps set the

Elsewhere - Kedlyne Demosthene Wood English Composition 102...

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Kedlyne Demosthene Wood English Composition 102 Formal Paper #2 Elsewhere The purpose of a setting in a piece of literature helps set the mood, or the feeling to a piece. Authors strategically pick a setting to pick the mood or tone, provide context of the surroundings, help foreshadow the plot, or provide a sense of irony. When an author purposely does not include the setting, the audiences’ mind begins to wonder and that creates a mysterious feeling to the piece. For example in the play The Pillowman , written by Martin McDonagh, has no setting which emphasizing McDonagh’s main arguments. The main characters, Katurian and Michal, live in a totalitarian regime where they’re being questioned about Katurians’s short stories that are linked to the real murders of children. The tone is mysterious and creepy because the audience has no idea where this story takes place nor how much power the government has. In The Pillowman Martin MacDonagh chooses to set the play in a totalitarian regime because it helps the author emphasize the themes of freedom of speech and child abuse, while creating arguments focused around the theme and create questions about the society we live in today. One of the themes expressed in The Pillowman is freedom of speech; the setting of the play helps the author express the argument of how important freedom of speech is in society and how much can an author be responsible for the effects it has on the readers. Since the play 1
Kedlyne Demosthene doesn’t have a time or a place the readers don’t know how much power the government has. The first implication of the restriction of speech in the society that the author creates is when Katurian first gets brought in and the first thing he thinks of is his stories. Katurian thinks that the government brought him in because they think his stories are political or socially alarming and he says, “… that’s what I do, I tell stories. No axe to the grind, no anything to grind. No social anything whatsoever… unless political came in by accident, or something seemed political came” (McDonagh 8). He informs the cops that the stories he writes is based on imagination and has nothing to do with him trying to rally against the government. The violence that occurs in the play triggers the argument, should there be a limit of freedom of speech? Should the author be responsible for the effect it has on the audience? The author uses murders of children to ignite a strong response from the readers. McDonagh knows that the murders of children is extreme and

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