First Simple Quiz - AJ Thaler TA Bryce Mangelson First Simple Quiz The imaginary world of the Himba is at the heart of the Himba culture The common

First Simple Quiz - AJ Thaler TA Bryce Mangelson First...

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AJ Thaler, TA: Bryce Mangelson, First Simple Quiz, October 13, 2014The imaginary world of the Himba is at the heart of the Himba culture. The common ideas surrounding religious belief and the family structure help to bind the Himba to one another.Despite having a standard for such beliefs, the understanding of the imaginary worlds created by the Himba varies from person to person, just as students at BYU hold many core beliefs in common, yet also have differing views in other facets. As individuals do in every society, the Himba balance their own views of the collective imaginary world with the traditional views, and use these interpretations to navigate through the accepted social structure, the functions of marriage, and the challenges of morality. The Himba people possess a collective imaginary world based upon a traditional Himba religion. The imaginary world is constructed to help guide the Himba throughout their lives. Thisimaginary world is highly respected and treasured among the Himba.Religion plays perhaps the most significant role in the imaginary world of the Himba. It is possible to separate Himba religious beliefs into three categories: deity worship, omiti, and ancestral worship. The first of these is heavily reliant upon the Himba creation myth, in which Mukuru, an omnipotent and benevolent god, created the earth and all of the creatures upon it. Mukuru, the Original Ancestor, guided the first man and woman following their entrance into theworld until the woman accidentally gored Mukuru in the groin, and Mukuru withdrew from the earth and ceased to guide humankind. The Himba believe devoutly in this creation myth, and much of their society reflects a deep belief and respect for Mukuru. Mukuru, to the Himba people, is a very benevolent god, as shown in Kavetonwa’s conversation with his father about muhona, who are men that are very generous with their wealth; “We learn that Mukuru is good, that he only blesses us and never curses us…Mukuru answers ‘yes’ to our petitions…Mukuru must be a muhona.” (Crandall 188)
AJ Thaler, TA: Bryce Mangelson, First Simple Quiz, October 13, 2014The Himba people involve Mukuru in many decisions, and worship Mukuru often, as he is the example of ultimate good. The Himba aspire to act the way that Mukuru would act, and avoid acting in ways such that Mukuru would not. The deity known as Mukuru to the Himba people is the only god, and is “the same god who looks over all the peoples of the world…and he is the most powerful being in the heavens.” (47) To the Himba, the life that Mukuru gives is a most precious gift, even until the time omiti takes it away. Omiti is the Himba belief in what is essentially black magic. In Himba culture, there is nosuch thing as a natural death. Death is always as a result of omiti. Omiti, despite being able to take away life through what seems to be natural causes, is not natural in any way. Instead, the powers of omiti are utilized by resentful or otherwise ill-meaning people against Himba peoples.

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