Religiosity and Ethical Behavior in Organizations- A Symbolic Interactionist Perspective

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Religiosity and Ethical Behavior in Organizations: A Symbolic Interactionist PerspectiveAuthor(s): Gary R. Weaver and Bradley R. AgleSource: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Jan., 2002), pp. 77-97Published by: Academy of ManagementStable URL: Accessed: 23-11-2016 06:28 UTCREFERENCES Linked references are available on JSTOR for this article:You may need to log in to JSTOR to access the linked references.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusteddigital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information aboutJSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atAcademy of Managementis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to TheAcademy of Management ReviewThis content downloaded from 128.95.104.109 on Wed, 23 Nov 2016 06:28:37 UTCAll use subject to
@ Academy of Management Review2002, Vol. 27, No. 1, 77-97.RELIGIOSITY AND ETHICAL BEHAVIOR INORGANIZATIONS: A SYMBOLICINTERACTIONIST PERSPECTIVEGARY R. WEAVERUniversity of DelawareBRADLEY R. AGLEUniversity of PittsburghClaims that religion can influence ethical behavior in business are plausible to manypeople but problematic in light of existing research. Our analysis indicates thatreligious role expectations, internalized as a religious self-identity, can influenceethical behavior. However, relationships of religious role expectations to behavior aremoderated by religious identity salience and religious motivational orientation. Weconclude by discussing the influence of organizational context on religious identitysalience and the need for innovative and interdisciplinary empirical research onreligion and ethical behavior in organizations.Religions often have much to say about ethi-cal behavior in business organizations, eitherdirectly or by implication. National meetings atboth the Academy of Management and the So-ciety for Business Ethics have featured sessionsfocused on the ethical implications of religiousperspectives for business behavior, and in 1997Business Ethics Quarterly devoted an entire is-sue to the topic. However, business ethics in-volves not only evaluative questions but alsoempirical ones (Trevifio & Weaver, 1994). Wemay grant, for example, that a particular reli-gion has ethical implications for business prac-tice but still wonder whether or not those impli-cations actually make a difference in thebusiness behavior of that religion's adherents.

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