wildlife - Running head WILDLIFE 1 Wildlife Animals are...

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Running head: WILDLIFE 1 Wildlife Animals are usually attracted to the airports by different factors depending on their adaptation and the prevailing weather conditions in the areas where such airports are located. Several species of birds and mammals have been found to pose serious dangers to planes just by their presence around the airports. This report provides an in-depth analysis of the animals that are commonly found around the airports and the reasons why they are mainly attracted to the airport. In the US Coyotes The first classes of animals that pose the greatest danger at the airports are the mammals. According to a survey by the Federal Aviation Authority, mammals accounted for more than 14% of strikes between 1990 and 2007 (Cleary & Dickey, 2010). The most common type of mammals is the coyotes found across the North American region. What attract Coyotes to the airports are the rabbits that live on the overgrown grass vegetation within the airports. Coyotes also feed on mice that sometimes burrow in the airport ground. They pose the biggest danger when they wander on the runway, especially during landing or take off, thereby increasing the chances of a strike. According to a report by the General Aviation Authority in Canada, coyotes are usually active during the night up to the early morning hours when there is minimal human activity (Cleary & Dolbeer, 2009). The best way to manage coyote is to remove the vegetation that supports the rabbit population. Airport management is also advised to use gas cartridges for fumigation to help destroy the rodents. Traps or snares can also be used as well as shooting the animals directly should they appear on the runway.
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WILDLIFE 2 White-tailed Deer The second most regular animal is the white-tailed deer that roams most of the US airports. They usually hide on the long strands of trees and brushes that also act as their biggest attraction. Deer feed on the tender brushes and twigs. Clearing the trees and the brushes is one of the ways of managing the deer problem. The Deer pose great danger when they veer onto the runway just like the coyotes. Feral Dogs Other mammals include the feral dogs that do not necessarily habituate within the airport. Feral dogs are essentially wild dogs and are attracted to areas where waste foods are available. The dogs are not restricted by any particular climate and are to be found in nearly all the airports in the US. Their most effective management would be to clear any food disposal sites within the vicinity of the airport. Foxes The foxes are other common mammals around the northern American airports. These depend on the availability of such prey as the rabbit, rodents, insects, and some fruit species. Like the coyote, foxes are most active during the night when human activity is significantly low.
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