Phil411 Study guide first exam f06 Wheeler

Phil411 Study guide first exam f06 Wheeler - PHIL 411: An...

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Unformatted text preview: PHIL 411: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Philosophy Study Questions First Examination Fall 2006 Every question on the examination will be based on these questions. V 1. What are the principle differences between the pre-philosophical ancient MM 3* w w; Greek understanding of the world and the early pre-socratic understanding of a“? the world? Explain why someone might think the early pre-socratic '“"'”“" ‘ n“ "l" . . . . . . . ’ ' bu understanding IS an improvement ver thgprsiphilojophmal understand1ng."j‘”m “~47 h ‘l W 'mhLb‘ . UV“ a? £3“. _ J ‘4" k ‘ . ,u .‘JVLJ )hnU‘ 9 ‘3‘ c.‘ Rh.’ \ “h - rb\$<~u‘l- 0:; a)” bf “aw hu‘ «J‘sz ‘0‘“? ‘ "“du‘ .’ [M‘ NW‘ ‘W‘M\ . ' ‘u’ * *flk“ PL \ 5‘” m '7 .hx‘m-“fi ‘w‘cu. W «authb What is the anc1ent Creek conception of a KOSMOS? What are Thales , ’ With» Anaximander’s, and Anaximenes’ central claims about the KOSMOS? Argue that Anaximander’s view improves upon Thales’ view. Argue that Anaximenes’ view improves upon Anaximander’s view. 3. Consider the following argument from the Phaedo 91 e-93a: P1: If the soul is a harmony of physical parts, then the soul does not last longer than the body. P2: The soul lasts longer than the body. C: The soul is not a harmony of physical parts. State an objection to P1. (Remember that the only way to object to a conditional statement is to assume the antecedent [the ’if’ clause] is true and argue that, nevertheless, the consequent [the ’then’ clause] is false.) 4. In the Euthyphro, at 10d, Euthyphro claims that the pious is what all the gods love. Explain Socrates’ argument (found at 10d—11b) against Euthyphro’s definition. 5. In the Apology at 25a-b, Socrates argues that only an expert could improve or corrupt the young. Argue that Socrates’ argument is unsound. 6. Consider the following argument from the Crito: P1: If (1) the laws provided for one’s birth, nurture, education, and other basic goods, and if (2) one did not reject the laws and leave the community, and if (3) one made no effort to reform the laws, then one has made a just agreement to obey the laws. P2: Socrates has satisfied conditions 1 - 3 of P1. C: Socrates has made a just agreement to obey the laws. Argue against P1. (Remember that the only way to criticize a conditional statement is to assume the antecedent [the ’if’ clause] is true and argue that, nevertheless, the consequent [the ’then’ clause] is false.) 7. State Plato’s concept of knowledge (as presented in my lecture on Plato’s the Theaetetus). For each necessary condition, present an example that demonstrates why the condition is necessary. 8. Consider the following problem: Socrates examines the Views others have about Virtue, and refutes them. Socrates claims to be on a mission from god (Apollo) to get others to care about Virtue. Problem: How does refuting their Views on Virtue help them to care about Virtue? Argue for a solution to this problem. 9. Consider the following problem: Socrates claims to know nothing. Socrates makes claims that imply he has knowledge: a. Virtue is knowledge. b. Weakness of the will is impossible. c. No one is voluntarily Vicious. Problem: How can he both know and not know? Argue for a solution to this problem. 10. Consider the following problem: Socrates clearly leads people out of their ignorance. Socrates claims not to be a teacher. Problem: How is this possible? Argue for a solution to this problem. 11. Consider the following problem: If knowledge is Virtue and only the virtuous should rule, then Socrates’ politics must be aristocratic. Socratic elenchus can be applied to anyone, and Socrates claims that, for all human beings, the unexamined life is not worth living. So his philosophical method is frankly democratic. Problem: ls Socrates an aristocrat or a democrat? Argue for a solution to this problem. 12. Consider the following argument: P1: For every conclusion of "scientific research" C and every argument A of weight w made in support of C, there is an argument B (9é A) of weight 27 = w in support of not-C. P2: One should only assent to what has more evidence in its favor than otherwise. C: One should suspend judgment with respect to all of the conclusions of scientific research. Present an argument against P1. Present an argument against P2. 13. Consider the following argument: P1: One should assent to claim A if, and only if, (1) A is the product of passive sensory impressions and (2) one is compelled to assent to A. P2: Real objects are never the products of passive sensory impressions, and one is never involuntarily led to assent to claims about real objects. C: One should never assent to claims about real objects. Present an argument against P1. Present an argument against P2. 14. State Plato’s conception of truth. Provide an example that illustrates this concept. Based on your understanding of Pyrrhonian Skepticism, argue that we cannot know any scientific truths about real objects. 15. Describe the chief characteristics of the ancient Greek Sophists. Using Plato’s conception of truth, argue for an interpretation of the following statement from Protagoras: DJ Man is the measure of all things— of things that are, that they are, and f things that are not, that they are not. a W'- ‘l’t‘r °° ((M‘ EN, 93 .34" as “‘9 93 3" -Q::‘r‘ h. 1°“va at“ 16. What is an enumeratlve definition? Prov1de an 3%mp e of an e umeratlve definition. What is an essential definition? Provide an example of an essential definition. State the Socratic Method of Elenchus. Provide an example of this methfi (ei er from P1395 dialogue, or one that you have invented). a g L‘gi— tc‘tk M k¥ Ark r 17. Consi r the followinig‘cidn‘c'éptiofi'gjusticé’L“‘ Ali" 4‘ kb’j 'WW-Si‘fi Qé‘el/ P is just iff P gives to each what is owed to them. Argue that this conception is incorrect. 18. What was the motivation for Ionian Presocratic philosophy? What was the motivation for Pythagorian philosophy? Argue that these two conceptions are compatible. ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2008 for the course PHIL 411 taught by Professor Wheeler during the Fall '06 term at UCSD.

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Phil411 Study guide first exam f06 Wheeler - PHIL 411: An...

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