Cupid and Psyche - Andrew Demkovich Humanities 1102...

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Andrew Demkovich Humanities 1102 02/04/2007 Cupid and Psyche The myth of Cupid and Psyche has put a fairy tale ending in many stories to come, even if it is a story as old as any other. The Greek goddess of love and beauty, Venus, was losing her spotlight to the king’s youngest daughter Psyche. Psyche had passed Venus in beauty and the people recognized her as the new goddess. Venus was jealous and angry, she sent her son Cupid, the god of love, to make sure Psyche would marry a demon or monster. When cupid laid his eyes on Psyche he instantly fell in love, and was determined to marry her. The king and Psyche’s two sisters were also concerned that people were interested but would never marry Psyche. The king asked an oracle what he should do, but was told that Psyche be left on a mountain where she would be matched with an evil demon, or monster. The king and his two daughters were depressed but in the end left Psyche on the high rocky hill. Cupid had Zephyrus, god of the west wind, to lift her to Cupid’s, palace. Psyche
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Cupid and Psyche - Andrew Demkovich Humanities 1102...

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