Republic - Plato (trans. Reeve) - Reeve-PlatoRepub-00Fnt...

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PLATO Republic
PLATO Republic Translated from the New Standard Greek Text, with Introduction, by C. D. C. R EEVE Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. Indianapolis/Cambridge
Copyright © 2004 by Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. All rights reserved 08 07 06 05 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 For further information, please address: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. P.O. Box 44937 Indianapolis, Indiana 46244-0937 Cover design by Abigail Coyle Interior design by Jennifer Plumley Composition by William Hartman Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Plato. [Republic. English] Republic / translated from the new standard Greek text, with introduction, by C.D.C. Reeve. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and indexes. ISBN 0-87220-737-4 (hardcover) — ISBN 0-87220-736-6 (pbk.) 1. Political science—Early works to 1800. 2 Utopias. I. Reeve, C.D.C., 1948– II. Title. JC71.P513 2004 321'.07—dc22 2004013418 ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-737-0 (cloth) ISBN-13: 978-0-87220-736-3 (paper) eISBN: 978-1-60384-013-2 (ebook)
For Daddy on his 88th birthday, with much love.
vii Contents Preface viii Introduction ix Select Bibliography xxviii Synopsis xxx Note to the Reader xxxiv THE REPUBLIC Book 1 1 Book 2 36 Book 3 66 Book 4 103 Book 5 136 Book 6 176 Book 7 208 Book 8 238 Book 9 270 Book 10 297 Glossary of Terms 327 Glossary and Index of Names 330 General Index 338
viii Preface I have been a student of the Republic since I first encountered it as an undergraduate at Trinity College, Dublin. In 1988 I published a book about it ( Philosopher-Kings ). Four years later, I published a revision of G. M. A. Grube’s excellent translation. Perhaps I should have rested content with that, but my desire to have a Republic translation of my own proved too strong. The fruit of five years’ work, it is now in print. Naturally, I hope it improves on existing translations. If so, I have their producers largely to thank. Certainly, I have ransacked them for assistance. Tom Griffith has helped greatly, Robin Waterfield too, and also (in the case of Books 5 and 10) Stephen Halliwell. Over the years, my respect has grown for earlier translations—for that of George Grube, from which I learned a huge amount, but also for those of Allan Bloom and Paul Shorey. Every translation, even the most self-consciously and flat-footedly slavish, is somewhat interpretative. There is no avoiding that. But I have tried to make this one as uninterpretative and close to the original as possible. One con- scious deviation from strict accuracy, however, will be obvious at a glance. The Republic is largely in reported speech. Socrates is relating a conversation he had in the past. But I have cast his report as an explicit dialogue in direct speech, with identified speakers. In the Theaetetus, Plato has Eucleides adopt a similar stratagem. “This is the book,” he says to Terpsion; “You see, I have written it out like this: I have not made Socrates relate the conversation as he related it to me, but I represent him as speaking directly to the persons with whom he said he had this conversation.” Decades of teaching the Republic

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