brown v. the board of education

brown v. the board of education - Brown v. The Board of...

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Brown v. The Board of Education
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Brown v. The Board of Education There are many problems in our world today, and some of which one couldn’t imagine used to be any problems because of how absurd it sounds. In 1954 a landmark Supreme Court Case was brought about that challenged the “separate but equal” rule that had control of how African Americans were treated in the US. “In Topeka, Kansas, a black third-grader named Linda Brown had to walk one mile through a railroad switchyard to get to her black elementary school, even though a white elementary school was only seven blocks away. Linda's father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in the white elementary school, but the principal of the school refused. Brown went to McKinley Burnett, the head of Topeka's branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and asked for help. The NAACP was eager to assist the Browns, as it had long wanted to challenge segregation in public schools. With Brown's complaint, it had "the right plaintiff at the right time." Other black parents joined Brown, and, in 1951, the NAACP requested an injunction that would forbid the segregation of Topeka's public schools” (Cozzens). Many people in the Black community supported this progression forward to breaking down the wall the segregation as well as some white folks. One of the major arguments had to do with the psychological aspect of the children, “Psychological studies have shown that segregation has negative effects on black children. By segregating white students from black students, a badge of inferiority is placed on the black students, a system of separation beyond school is perpetuated, and the unequal benefits accorded to white students as a result of their informal contacts with one another is reinforced. The U.S. District Court found that segregation did have negative effects on black children” (Landmark Supreme Court Cases). The 14 th amendment was supposed to create equal facilities and treatment of all people within the United States. The constitution states that, “No State shall . . . deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws . ” The NAACP argued that, “the Fourteenth Amendment
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precludes a state from imposing distinctions based upon race” (Landmark Supreme Court Cases). By having racial segregation in public schools it minimizes the progress and benefits to a group as a whole just because of race. There was also an argument that when the fourteenth amendment was drafted
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This note was uploaded on 05/08/2008 for the course PSCI 100 taught by Professor Kupfer during the Spring '07 term at CSU San Marcos.

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brown v. the board of education - Brown v. The Board of...

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