Saint Augustine

Saint Augustine - referring to god. Augustine is very...

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Through these sections of book eight, Saint Augustine seems to be discussing inner battle with religion. He meets the chaste Lady Continence, who may or may not be a real person or just a metaphor for something else. Calling her chaste alludes to her being pure, or, for lack of a better term, a good person. Perhaps this purity means that Lady Continence is religion itself reaching out with “pious hands filled with numerous good examples for me to follow.” What is very confusing, however, is at the bottom of page 151 when Saint Augustine writes, “He will not withdraw himself so that you fall. Make the leap without anxiety; he will catch you and heal you.” From my perspective it seems as if the other figure talked about in that quote is god. What has thrown me off is the bolded part, where the ‘h’ in “he” is lowercase while is should be uppercase if it is truly
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Unformatted text preview: referring to god. Augustine is very hesitant, possibly because he is unsure as to whether or not he is capable of living a religious life given his previous vices. He even goes as far as to call for god to end my impure life right now, almost as if he is begging to be forced into religion. The book he reads in section thirty is the bible, in which he finds a better understanding of his situation. He may not read much of it, but he does find a truth in what he is reading so much so that he reaches an epiphany. All of the shadows of doubt were dispelled, and it suggests that Saint Augustine is ready to accept this Lady Continence and put an end to his impure life. In relation to Saint Augustines story, this is a clear turning point as he begins to embrace the Catholic faith....
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