TheColdWarandDiplomacy - Running head THE COLD WAR AND...

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Running head: THE COLD WAR AND DIPLOMACY 1 The Cold War and Diplomacy Ron Oliver Strayer University POL 300 Assignment 1 Professor Tracy Herman August 2, 2015
THE COLD WAR AND DIPLOMACY 2 The Cold War and Diplomacy The Reagan Doctrine In the political history of the United States, the Presidential Doctrines hold an important position. Presidential Doctrine can be defined as a set of principles or practices applied by a President to a particular situation, region, or government, and a President may formulate a doctrine alone or with the help of advisers within the entire administration (Jones, 2013). From the Monroe Doctrine to the Reagan Doctrine, in the domain of the U.S. legislative issues and remote issues, presidential principles have assumed a critical part, and if dissected from the point of view of the Cold War, the significance of the Reagan Doctrine can be learned. U.S diplomatic efforts during the presidents time in office The presidential convention of Reagan which is prevalently known as the Reagan Doctrine assumed a critical part in diminishing the worldwide impact of the Soviet Union over the span of the Cold War however it additionally assumed a vital part in forming the long haul outside strategies of the United States in a tumultuous way basically on account of its part in supporting the counter Sandinista agitators (called "Contras") and for in the end inciting the U.S. – Iran clash, and it is because of such a parts, to the point that even today the Reagan Doctrine is viewed as a critical political approach strategically. Diplomatic doctrine the president followed. Historians and political strategists have often identified the Reagan Doctrine as a “strategy orchestrated and implemented by the United States under the Reagan Administration to oppose the global influence of the Soviet Union during the final years of the Cold War” (Sayeed,
THE COLD WAR AND DIPLOMACY 3 2014). And it is due to its importance in respect of U.S. foreign policy that despite of the doctrine’s duration being less than a decade, it remained as “the centerpiece of United States foreign policy from the early 1980s until the end of the Cold War in 1991” (Sayeed, 2014).

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