Chapter 14 - Roark Chapter 14: The House Divided, 1846-1861...

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Roark Chapter 14: The House Divided, 1846-1861 Notes and Quotes for HIS 1043 by Rex H. Ball, Senior Lecturer Compare and contrast the Thomas R. Gray account of Nat Turner’s Confession, and the description of John Brown’s life on pages 343 and 344 of Roark. Then look at the section Fruits of War . It all boiled down to power. The South wanted equality in the Senate, so a slave state had to be admitted with every free state. The North’s population had doubled the South’s free population, and many in the North had no sympathy with the South’s fears concerning the existence of slavery if it did not continue to expand. As the authors note, few northerners wanted to destroy slavery—and those few were radical abolitionists. What many objected to was the veto the South had over legislation favored by the new industrial and commercial interests. And as far as the Great Compromise was concerned, it protected the interests of the small states. The South had turned it into a way to protect its peculiar institution—that is to say, to protect particular sectional interests. Why, the North asked, should the South get special treatment? The Democrats nominated Lewis Cass, the champion of
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Chapter 14 - Roark Chapter 14: The House Divided, 1846-1861...

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