Chapter 13 - Roark Chapter 13: The Slave South, 1820-1860...

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Roark Chapter 13: The Slave South, 1820-1860 Notes and Questions for HIS1043 by Rex H. Ball, Senior Lecturer Examine the first section of the chapter dealing with Nat Turner’s Rebellion. Put it into context with Turner’s “confession” in Johnson. Then look at The Growing Distinctiveness of the South. Before Nat Turner, southerners could talk about slavery and emancipation; after, slavery became a closed topic. The South closed ranks behind their peculiar institution. The authors write that “Geographic expansion meant that slavery became more vigorous and profitable than ever, embraced more people, and increased the South’s political power.” I dispute two of the three contentions. As a commodity economy, the cotton kingdom of the South over time could only be marginally profitable. Plantation owners often owed great sums to their factors in England, and they were vulnerable to the market fluctuations all commodities go through. The proof of the argument came when the seceded South sought to pressure England to side with them by embargoing their Cotton early in the Civil War before the North could mount an effective blockade. England found other sources, and the South lost a chance to gain badly needed hard money.
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This note was uploaded on 05/08/2008 for the course HIS 1043 taught by Professor Rexball during the Spring '08 term at Texas San Antonio.

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Chapter 13 - Roark Chapter 13: The Slave South, 1820-1860...

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