Lab 2-Measurement of G

Lab 2-Measurement of G - Measurement of g Experiment#2...

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Measurement of g Experiment #2 April 24, 2007 Section 3 Introduction:
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The purpose of this lab is to calculate the acceleration of a plastic ball as it passes through two photogates and lands on an impact pad which contains a transducer. The photogates and sensor pad measures the elapsed time during the object’s freefall. This data allows one to measure the velocity of the object as it is in free fall. By using two photogates and one impact pad, one is able to calculate the change of velocity (also known as the acceleration) of the object as it falls down. The experiment is repeated at different heights in order to reaffirm that the acceleration of gravity is constant to matter what height one drops the ball from. The overall principle of this experiment is to prove and confirm the fact that the acceleration of gravity is 9.8 m/s 2 . Equations: 0 1 2 d v t gt 0 1 2 1 2 1 ( ) ( ) 2 D d v t t g t t 0 2 1 2 2 1 (2 2 D v t g t t t 0 2 1 ( 2 D v g t   2 1 1 (2 2 D d g t t t   1 2 2 1 2 D d g t t t t Procedure: To begin this experiment, we first determine the “offset” of the meter stick by using a block of metal that is exactly 5.00 centimeters. Using this value, we are able to see the potential error in measurements in which we perform using the meter stick. We then fix the photographs on a metal rod and measure the distance d in between the two. Then, the distance D between the second photogate and impact pad are calculated. After the equipment is properly set up, the ball is dropped through the photogates 10 times and data is collected. As the ball passes through the first photogate, the computer records the amount of time it takes for the ball to pass by the second photogate and land on the impact pad. This data is then used to calculate the average acceleration the ball experiences due to the force of gravity. This procedure is then repeated by varying the value of D while keeping d at a fixed distance. In order to account for any errors the transducer may have, the pad is also moved in subsequent trials. *Refer to the diagram on the following page to get a visual image of the experiment.* d = distance between two photogates D = distance between bottom photogate and impact pad D + d = total height v 0 = initial velocity t 1 = time traveled between first and second photogate t 2 = time traveled from bottom photogate to impact pad g = acceleration (g = 9.8 m/s 2 ) Mask
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Data: The values of g in the following graphs are calculated using the equation: 1 2 2 1 2 D d g t t t t Run #1: offset (m) 0 d (m) 0.082 D (m) 0.051 t1to2 (s) t2to3 (s) g (m/s 2 ) Measured Error 0.0955 0.0344 9.606149 0.286352013 0.0938 0.0343 9.565652 0.288735958 0.0947 0.0343 9.627724 0.288292354 0.096 0.0344 9.637906 0.286090503 0.0961 0.0345 9.57095 0.284528024 0.0928 0.0342 9.56862 0.290770142 0.094 0.0343 9.579736 0.288639456 0.0975 0.0347 9.511573 0.280817452 0.0961 0.0346 9.498249
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Lab 2-Measurement of G - Measurement of g Experiment#2...

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